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"I wish someone would tell me who is firing and what they are firing at"
-
Jellicoe,  upon first arriving at the scene of the fighting between the
British Battlecruisers and the German fleet

 

Getting Started

The "Getting Started" portion of the manual helps new players get started by going over basic concepts and operations.  It also provide an idea of how the game "works" in advance of playing it.

 

 

Click here to view the "Getting Started" portion of the manual file in your web browser

 

 

 

 

 

Screen Shots  (Click for full-sized image)

jutcircle.jpg (256124 bytes)

jutsmoke.jpg (233655 bytes)

 

"There seems to be something wrong with our bloody ships today"
- Beatty, after the second British Battlecruiser had exploded and sank

 



 

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Scenarios

#00 Getting Started

This scenario is designed to be used in conjunction with the Getting Started Help File to introduce you to the basics of playing the Jutland game. The scenario represents a hypothetical meeting of the British and German Battle Cruiser forces much as historically happened at the beginning of the Jutland battle.

#01 Initial Contact

1530 31 May 1916. When the German fleet sailed into the North Sea, the British intercepted their transmissions and knew that they had left port. But due to an intelligence failing, they failed to appreciate that the full German fleet was out. Nevertheless, they set sail with the combined Battle Cruiser and Grand Fleets
to meet this force and destroy it. First contact between the two feets occurred when the British Battle Cruiser Fleet encountered the German Battle Cruiser Force with the respective main fleets some distance away. For more information, see the Overlay Chart Situation_1610.bmp.

#02 The Run To The South

1610 31 May 1916. When the Battle Cruiser fleets clashed, the Germans recognized their apparent inferiority and quickly turned to sail to their main fleet. The British Battle Cruiser Fleet took chase and a fire fight ensued. When a German shot pierced the magazine of the Indefatigable, the British battle cruiser
exploded and sank, representing the first of several critical hits the British ships would suffer. Undeterred, Beatty and his Battle Cruiser Fleet continue the fight, although he would soon utter the words "There seems to be something wrong with our bloody ships today." For more information, see the Overlay Chart Situation_1610.bmp.

#03 The German Fleet Attacks

1650 31 May 1916. The surprising loss of the Indefatigable and the Queen Mary battle cruisers in quick succession had not stopped Beatty from chasing the German Battle Cruiser Force. But when the German High Seas Fleet unexpectantly appeared, he knew that the odds were no longer in his favor. With the huge guns of the German battleships blazing, Beatty turns the British Battle
Cruiser Fleet and races to rejoin the British Grand Fleet. For more information, see the Overlay Chart Situation_1650.bmp.

#04 The Run To The North

1730 31 May 1916. Using the superior speed of the British battle cruisers, Beatty was just able to stay ahead of the pursuing German fleet. But given the distance of the British Grand Fleet, he would be outnumbered for over an hour before he could rejoin Jellicoe. Still, the large battleships of the 5th Battle Squadron
were with his force and he had some ability to trade shots with the Germans during the "Run to the North". For more information, see the Overlay Chart Situation_1730.bmp.

#05 Clash Of The Dreadnoughts

1800 31 May 1916. After nearly two years of war, the main fleets of the British and German navies were about to clash. But the conditions were far from ideal for either side. There had been considerable confusion in the British fleets caused by the race Beatty had run with the Germans and the visibility at that time had dropped considerably, to the point that no one could really tell where the ships were and what they were doing. This led Jellicoe to remark "I wish someone would tell me who is firing and what they are firing at." Regardless, the battleships of the British and German navies were on a collision course in the
North Sea. For more information, see the Overlay Chart Situation_1800.bmp.

#06 Crossing the T

1830 31 May 1916. When Jellicoe encountered the German fleet, he had to decide how to deploy his battleships, without really knowing the composition of the German force or its direction.  Deciding to deploy to port, he organized his main force into a line of battle that would lead to a "Crossing of the T", the dream of every admiral. However, the German fleet had one maneuver at its disposal that could defeat this tactic, the Gefechtskehrtwendung, or "battle turn-around". For more information, see the Overlay Chart Situation_1830.bmp.

#07 German About Turn

1900 31 May 1916. When Scheer realized he was sailing his fleet into the British line of battle, he ordered a maneuver that had only been attempted in training, the "battle turn-around". With a single turn, the fleet was sailing in an opposite direction and away from danger. But Scheer decided at that point that he wasn't going to give up so easily and reversed course a second time to take another run at the powerful British fleet. For more information, see the Overlay Chart Situation_1900.bmp.

#08 The Chase Begins

1925 31 May 1916. After a second Gefechtskehrtwendung that directed
the German fleet back towards the British, Scheer engaged the British battleships a second time in the haze and mist. But after taking considerable damage, he decided to breakaway for a second time. To avoid being chased by the British, he ordered his battle cruisers to attack the British fleet, a desperate act called the "Deathride of the Battle Cruisers". For more information, see the Overlay Chart Situation_1925.bmp.

#09 The Battle of Jutland

1515 31 May 1916. The First World War had been raging for two years and still there had been no clash between the two main fleets of the British and German navies. Smaller clashes at Dogger Bank and Heligoland had provided the British with victories, but there was still the strong desire on their part for a significant
"Nelsonian" victory. When the combined German fleet set sail at the end of May 1916, it provided them with this opportunity.  Unknown to the German navy, their transmissions had been intercepted and it was well known to the British that they had set sail, although with what force was not clear. So it was no chance
encounter that the fleets would clash in the North Sea west of Danish Jutland. But what followed was completely unknown and as a reault the outcome of the First World War was completely in doubt.

#10 The Battle of Heligoland Bight

1100 28 Aug 1914. When the First World War began, the British were eager to use their superior naval forces. But the reluctance of the German navy to venture into the North Sea prevented a large scale encounter. To provide some opportunity for a clash, the British decided to send forces near the German outpost of Heligoland and attempt to start a fight.

#11 The Clash at Dogger Bank

0900 24 Jan 1915. The British had broken the German codes and could decipher their transmissions with some accuracy. When German battle cruisers set sail in early 1915, the British were in a position to react. The two battle cruiser forces meet in the area of the Dogger Bank in the North Sea and the Germans have made the mistake of including the obsolete cruiser Blucher in their force.

#12 The Battle of Jutland (Alt)

1530 31 May 1916. Historically the Battle of Jutland began with an encounter of the two Cruiser Fleets, leading to the Race to the South and the engagement of the German High Seas Fleet.  In this hypothetical scenario, the Cruiser Fleets miss each other, leading to separate encounters with unknown forces.